Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 216--217

A case of traumatic vacuum phenomenon in the sleeve of a nerve root due to nerve root avulsions


Hiromichi Ohsaka, Chikato Hayashi, Kazuhiko Omori, Youichi Yanagawa 
 Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Youichi Yanagawa
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University, Tokyo
Japan




How to cite this article:
Ohsaka H, Hayashi C, Omori K, Yanagawa Y. A case of traumatic vacuum phenomenon in the sleeve of a nerve root due to nerve root avulsions.J Emerg Trauma Shock 2017;10:216-217


How to cite this URL:
Ohsaka H, Hayashi C, Omori K, Yanagawa Y. A case of traumatic vacuum phenomenon in the sleeve of a nerve root due to nerve root avulsions. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2017 [cited 2022 Aug 15 ];10:216-217
Available from: https://www.onlinejets.org/text.asp?2017/10/4/216/216524


Full Text



Dear Editor,

A 46-year-old male patient experienced monoplegia of the right upper arm immediately after his temporal head struck the bottom of the sea while he was being buffeted by waves. A physician-staffed emergency helicopter evacuated the patient from the scene and transported him to our department. His medical and family history were unremarkable. On arrival, he had clear consciousness and his vital signs were stable. The physiological findings included the right neck pain, anesthesia of the right shoulder, dysesthesia of the right index and middle fingers, and a manual muscle testing grade of 0 at the right deltoids, biceps, and triceps muscles. Cervical computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a minute amount of gas in the sleeve of the right sixth nerve root [Figure 1]. A magnetic resonance image demonstrated that there were no traumatic lesions of the spinal cord and suggested right fifth and sixth nerve root avulsion [Figure 2]. His neurological signs showed no changes until the 5th day of hospitalization when he was discharged from the hospital. As he was tourist, he was followed at his local hospital.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

This is the first reported case, in which the vascular permeability (VP) was observed in the sleeve of a nerve root. CT is considered to be the imaging modality that most frequently detects the VP in trauma settings because the high spatial resolution allows for the detection of small amounts of gas, and with the improvements of spatial resolution that come year by year, it might be possible to detect minute amounts of gas in the sleeve.[1] The patient's main symptom originated from the cervical fifth and sixth nerve roots; however, CT did not detect the VP in the fifth sleeve. This might be because the complete resection of the sleeve resulted in the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid so that gas might move with the flow of fluid. On CT, gas in the sleeve may suggest nerve root avulsion if a patient does not have an open craniospinal fracture, pneumothorax, gas productive infection, or gas migration due to medical procedures.[2],[3]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Yanagawa Y, Ohsaka H, Jitsuiki K, Yoshizawa T, Takeuchi I, Omori K, et al. Vacuum phenomenon. Emerg Radiol 2016;23:377-82.
2Gohil I, Vilensky JA, Weber EC. Vacuum phenomenon: Clinical relevance. Clin Anat 2014;27:455-62.
3Omori K, Ishikawa K, Obinata M, Mishima K, Fukusato S, Ohsaka H, et al. Significance of the vacuum phenomenon in patients with trauma evaluated by whole-body computed tomography. Am J Emerg Med 2015;33:282-5.