Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
Home About us Editors Ahead of Print Current Issue Archives Search Instructions Subscribe Advertise Login 
Users online:967   Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size   


 
 Table of Contents    
LETTERS TO EDITOR  
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 70-71
Activities of a medical clinic for the general public at the olympic mountain bike competition during the COVID-19 pandemic


Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Submission16-Aug-2021
Date of Acceptance31-Aug-2021
Date of Web Publication4-Apr-2022
 

How to cite this article:
Yanagawa Y, Tada S, Morita Y, Masunaga K, Shakagori M, Muto T, Jitsuiki K. Activities of a medical clinic for the general public at the olympic mountain bike competition during the COVID-19 pandemic. J Emerg Trauma Shock 2022;15:70-1

How to cite this URL:
Yanagawa Y, Tada S, Morita Y, Masunaga K, Shakagori M, Muto T, Jitsuiki K. Activities of a medical clinic for the general public at the olympic mountain bike competition during the COVID-19 pandemic. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Jul 6];15:70-1. Available from: https://www.onlinejets.org/text.asp?2022/15/1/70/342506




Sir,

The 2020 Tokyo Olympics were moved to 2021 due to the developing global situation in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. On March 22, 2021, international spectators were banned from attending the 2020 Tokyo Olympics as new, more infectious variants began to circulate. The Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (TOC) established an isolation bubble system, obliging Olympians to comply with the rules in place to mitigate any disease spread.[1] They had to undergo regular screening tests for COVID-19 and were asked to commute only to and from the Olympic Village to their competition site. On July 8, 2021, all spectators were banned from the Tokyo venues after the government declared a COVID-19 state of emergency for the capital. Only three prefectures, including Shizuoka, holding events within the three cycling categories of the mountain bike, road, and track allowing spectators during the COVID-19 pandemic.

There were two medical clinics established for the mountain bike competition: One for the Olympians and their associates and one for spectators and volunteers. Each medical clinic had two separate buildings. One was for individuals suspected of having COVID-19, and the other was for those deemed unlikely to have COVID-19. This is the first report to describe the preparation and activities of a medical clinic for spectators and volunteers. After the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, 17 patients were treated over the 2-day Olympic mountain bike event. The details of the patients are summarized in [Table 1]. There were two patients who were transported to Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital for 2 days. One was a middle-aged Japanese woman who found she could not move just after entering the venue. After receiving a diagnosis of heatstroke and dehydration, she was transferred to Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital. A COVID-19 test was negative, and she returned home by herself. The other was a young male foreigner who was volunteering. He had come from Tokyo and had a fever of 38.0°C, tachycardia. The previous day, he had received his second injection of the COVID-19 vaccine. Whether the fever and tachycardia were side effects of the vaccination or due to COVID-19 infection could not be determined there, and he was transported to Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital. However, he refused any treatments and tests. He returned home after receiving advice not to have close contact with other people. Fortunately, there were no positive results of Olympians of the mountain bike for the COVID-19 test during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. However, after the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Japan warned that COVID-19 infections were surging at an unprecedented pace, as new cases hit a record high in Tokyo and Shizuoka Prefectures, overshadowing the Olympics. The Delta variant has led to a spread of infections unseen in the past. It was difficult to control the explosive spread of COVID-19 infection at the Olympics in the middle of the pandemic, despite the TOC's efforts to instate a variety of countermeasures for controlling the situation.
Table 1: Findings from 2 days of medical service at a clinic established at the mountain bike competition site in Izu city

Click here to view


Research quality and ethics statement

The authors followed applicable EQUATOR Network (http://www.equator-network.org/) guidelines, notably the CARE guideline, during the conduct of this report.

Financial support and sponsorship

This work was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Special Research in Subsidies for ordinary expenses of private schools from The Promotion and Mutual Aid Corporation for Private Schools of Japan.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
International Olympic Committee. The Playbook Athletes and Officials; February, 2021. Available from: https://stillmedab.olympic.org/media/Document%20Library/OlympicOrg/Games/Summer-Games/Games-Tokyo-2020-Olympic-Games/Playbooks/The-Playbook-Athletes-and-Officials.pdf. [Last accessed on 2022 Feb 27].  Back to cited text no. 1
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Dr. Youichi Yanagawa
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University, Tokyo
Japan
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jets.jets_110_21

Rights and Permissions



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

Top
  
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    References
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed491    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded25    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal