Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23-27

A study of the pattern of injuries sustained from road traffic accidents caused by impact with stray animals


1 Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of College of Nursing, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Department of Orthopedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
4 Department of General Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Prakash Kumar Sasmal
Department of General Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar - 751 019, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JETS.JETS_29_20

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Background: The incidence of road traffic accidents (RTA) is increasing every day, especially in developing nations. Amongst various attributable factors, the menace of the stray animals remains one of the most underrecognized factors leading to animal-vehicle collision (AVC). Objectives: Our prospective cross-sectional study aims to survey the incidence of RTA attributable to stray animals and record the pattern of injuries along with other epidemiological parameters. Methods: The present study was conducted at a tertiary care trauma centre located in a major city of eastern India, between June 2019 and March 2020. Variables like demographic details, type of vehicle and injury with severity score, use of safety gear including types of stray animals were collected and analysed. Results: A total of 185 patients had suffered RTA due to AVC during the study period. The median age of occurrence was 29.0 years. The evening was the most frequent time of accidents (4 PM to 8 PM) with two-wheelers affected in 92% of cases. Stray dogs account for 69% of cases followed by cattle 21% cases. 41% of all RTA victims had polytrauma. Patients with RTA due to impact with ox were found to have higher injury severity score (ISS). The ISS comparison between two-wheeler drivers with and without helmet and influence of alcohol were statistically significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: The study highlights an alarming incidence of RTA due to stray animals roaming freely on roads, thus adding significant morbidity and costs to the society. There is a need of the hour for imposing stringent measures from the appropriate authority, including public awareness to make sustainable action plans to prevent animal homelessness and wander freely on streets and major roads.


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