Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCH
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 67-72

Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in traumatic brain injury and Measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme by dipstick test


1 Department of Anesthesiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda MD 20814, USA
2 Department of Biomedical Instrumentation Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda MD 20814, USA
3 Department of Neurology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda MD 20814, USA

Correspondence Address:
Pushpa Sharma
Department of Anesthesiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda MD 20814
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.50739

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Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate the role of a mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) on the severity of brain injury, and the effects of pyruvate treatment in rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Materials and Methods: We examined rats subjected to closed head injury using a fluid percussion device, and treated with sodium pyruvate (antioxidant and substrate for PDH enzyme). At 72 h post injury, blood was analyzed for blood gases, acid-base status, total PDH enzyme using a dipstick test and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as a marker of oxidative stress. Brain homogenates from right hippocampus (injured area) were analyzed for PDH content, and immunostained hippocampus sections were used to determine the severity of gliosis and PDH E1-∞ subunit. Results: Our data demonstrate that TBI causes a significant reduction in PDH enzyme, disrupt-acid-base balance and increase oxidative stress in blood. Also, lower PDH enzyme in blood is related to the increased gliosis and loss of its PDH E1-∞ subunit PDH in brain tissue, and these effects of TBI were prevented by pyruvate treatment. Conclusion: Lower PDH enzyme levels in blood are related to the global oxidative stress, increased gliosis in brain, and severity of brain injury following TBI. These effects can be prevented by pyruvate through the protection of PDH enzyme and its subunit E-1.


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