Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 256--260

Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities


Luke Hansen1, Aisha Shaheen2, Marie Crandall3 
1 Department of Internal Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, USA
2 Department of Surgery, Albert Einstein University, New York, USA
3 Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Marie Crandall
Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago
USA

Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36). Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED) for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36). Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury.


How to cite this article:
Hansen L, Shaheen A, Crandall M. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities.J Emerg Trauma Shock 2014;7:256-260


How to cite this URL:
Hansen L, Shaheen A, Crandall M. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Jun 1 ];7:256-260
Available from: http://www.onlinejets.org/article.asp?issn=0974-2700;year=2014;volume=7;issue=4;spage=256;epage=260;aulast=Hansen;type=0