Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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 Table of Contents    
LETTER TO EDITOR  
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 172-173
An unexpected complication of sneezing: Blow-out orbital fracture


1 Department of Emergency, Atatürk Research and Training Hospital, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, Izmir, Turkey
2 Department Radiology, Atatürk Research and Training Hospital, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, Izmir, Turkey

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Date of Web Publication13-Jul-2015
 

How to cite this article:
Akyol PY, Erol Ünlüer EE, Oyar O, Bilgin S. An unexpected complication of sneezing: Blow-out orbital fracture. J Emerg Trauma Shock 2015;8:172-3

How to cite this URL:
Akyol PY, Erol Ünlüer EE, Oyar O, Bilgin S. An unexpected complication of sneezing: Blow-out orbital fracture. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 9];8:172-3. Available from: http://www.onlinejets.org/text.asp?2015/8/3/172/145409


Dear Editor,

Blow-out fracture is characterized by a damage to the orbital walls with intact orbital margins and bone fragments displaced outside the orbit. The common mechanism of injury for a orbital fracture is blunt trauma to the orbit or forehead. [1] A 32-years-old man was brought to our emergency department with a swollen condition on his right orbita which began after sneezing. He had horizontal diplopia and crepitus as a sign of periorbital emphysema. Computed tomography scan revealed blow-out fracture on the medial wall of right orbita image, extra conala dipose tissue protruded partially to the superior oblique muscle and free air inside the soft tissue areas [Figure 1] and [Figure 2].
Figure 1: Blow-out fracture is seen on the medial wall of right orbita image and free air inside the soft tissue areas

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Figure 2: On the medial wall of orbita, extraconal adipose tissue protrudes partially to the superior oblique muscle and free air inside the soft tissue areas

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Clinical symptoms of orbital fracture are diplopia, enophthalmos, or restriction of gaze. [2] Orbital emphysema without impaired vision is not a life-threatening condition and usually resolves spontaneously within 2 weeks. Cases of spontaneous orbital emphysema caused by sneezing, cough, or nose blowing are very rare.

 
   References Top

1.
Rzymska-Grala I, Palczewski I, Blaz M, Zmorzyński M, Gołębiowski M, Wanyura H. A peculiar blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall complicated by extensive subcutaneous emphysema: A case report and review of the literature. Pol J Radiol 2012;77:64-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Kunz C, Sigron GR, Jaquiéry C. Functional outcome after non-surgical management of orbital fractures - the bias of decision-making according to size of defect: Critical review of 48 patients. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2013;51:486-92.  Back to cited text no. 2
    

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Correspondence Address:
Pinar Yeşim Akyol
Department of Emergency, Atatürk Research and Training Hospital, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, Izmir
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.145409

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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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