Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 154-158

Patterns and outcomes of traumatic neck injuries: A population-based observational study


1 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
2 Trauma Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad Medical Corporation; Department of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar
3 Trauma Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
4 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad Medical Corporation; Department of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar

Correspondence Address:
Ayman El-Menyar
Trauma Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad Medical Corporation; Department of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha
Qatar
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.160723

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Objectives: We aimed to analyze the pattern and outcome of traumatic neck injury (TNI) in a small population. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of all TNI patients who were admitted to the trauma center between 2008 and 2012. Patients' demographics, details of TNI, associated injuries, hospital course, and mortality were analyzed. Results: A total of 51 TNI cases were included revealing an overall incidence of 0.61/100,000 population. The mean age was 31 ± 9 years. The most frequent mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crash (29.4%) followed by stab (17.6%), machinery injury (17.6%), fall (9.8%), and assault (7.8%). Larynx, thyroid gland, trachea, jugular veins, and carotid were the commonly injured structures. The majority of cases had Zone II TNI whereas isolated injury was observed in 11 cases. TNI were mainly presented with active bleeding (38%), hypovolemic shock (16%) and respiratory distress (16%). Surgical interventions mainly included simple repair and closure (53%), vein ligation (12%), repair of major arteries (4%), tracheal repair (6%), larynx and hypopharynx repair (4%), and repair of parotid gland (2%). Neck exploration was performed in 88%, and emergency tracheostomy was required in 18% of cases. Overall mortality rate was 11.8%, of which five patients had associated injuries, and one had isolated TNI. Conclusion: TNI are not frequent but represent an alarming serious entity in Qatar. Patients with persistent signs of major injuries should undergo early operative interventions. Moreover, the effective injury prevention program should be developed to minimize these preventable injuries in the majority of cases.


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