Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
Home About us Editors Ahead of Print Current Issue Archives Search Instructions Subscribe Advertise Login 
Users online:659   Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 88-96

Blunt traumatic injury in the Arab Middle Eastern populations


1 Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
2 Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad General Hospital; Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar
3 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
4 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar; Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

Correspondence Address:
Ayman El-Menyar
Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma Surgery Section, Hamad General Hospital; Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.130878

Rights and Permissions

Background: Trauma represents a global public health concern with an estimated 5 million deaths annually. Moreover, the incidence of blunt traumatic injuries (BTI) particularly road traffic accidents (RTAs) and workplace-related injuries are rising throughout the world-wide. Objectives: We aimed to review the epidemiology and prevention of BTI, in the Arab Middle East. Materials and Methods: A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. We used the keywords "traumatic injuries," "blunt" "epidemiology," "Arab Middle East" between December 1972 and March 2013. Results: The most common mechanisms of BTI in our region are RTAs, falls from height, struck by heavy objects and pedestrian motor vehicle trauma crashes. The rate of RTA and occupational injuries are markedly increased in the region due to rapid industrial development, extreme climatic conditions and unfamiliar working environment. However, lack of reliable information on these unintentional injuries is mainly responsible for the underestimation of this trauma burden. This knowledge deficit shields the extent of the problem from policy makers, leading to continued fatalities. These preventable injuries in turn add to the overall financial burden on the society through loss of productivity and greater need of medical and welfare services. Conclusion: In the Arab Middle East, population-based studies on the incidence, mechanism of injury, prevention and outcome of BTI are not well-documented. Therefore, region-specific BTI studies would strengthen surveillance to better understand the burden of these injuries in the region.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4251    
    Printed80    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded38    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal