Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 106-109

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma


1 Division of Trauma and Critical Care, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
2 Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
3 Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio; Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
4 Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA

Correspondence Address:
Sandra Starnes
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio; Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.110757

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Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.


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