Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23-27

Teamwork in the trauma room evaluation of a multimodal team training program


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA
2 Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA
3 Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, 203 Sloan Hall, Mt. Pleasant, MI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Bradley Peckler
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.93106

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Introduction: Poor teamwork leads to preventable medical errors, and thus negatively impacts medical care. One way to improve teamwork is training. A multimodality team training program was designed to impact the attitudes and behavior of first-year residents who will encounter medical situations in the trauma room. The training program included low-fidelity role plays, lectures, and high-fidelity simulation with feedback. Materials and Methods: The training program was a one-day workshop that was conducted twice, once for each of the two groups over two days at the beginning of the academic year in July. A total of 41 first-year interns (10 Emergency Medicine and 31 Surgery) were recruited for participation. Participants completed a Situational judgment test (SJT) on trauma teamwork before training. The training began with a low-fidelity simulation that served as an icebreaker to team concepts. Subsequently, a lecture with discussion provided key points regarding teamwork in the trauma room. A high-fidelity simulation then allowed participation in one of four trauma room scenarios with medical expert debriefing. The course concluded with a course summary and an assessment of participant attitudes regarding training along with a second administration of SJT. Results: Participant reactions to the training were positive overall. Results of SJT showed a positive effect for team training in three of the four possible comparisons. Conclusion: The program was well received by the residents. Results suggest that a comprehensive training approach using role play, lecture, and simulation can positively affect behavioral choices for teamwork in the trauma room.


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