Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
Home About us Editors Ahead of Print Current Issue Archives Search Instructions Subscribe Advertise Login 
Users online:2462   Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 184-187

Who is willing to risk his life for a patient with a potentially fatal, communicable disease during the peak of A/H1N1 pandemic in Israel?


1 Department of Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Givat Shmuel; Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health sciences, Ben Gurion University, Israel
2 Department of Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Givat Shmuel, Israel
3 Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

Correspondence Address:
Yaron Bar-Dayan
Department of Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Givat Shmuel; Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health sciences, Ben Gurion University
Israel
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.82203

Rights and Permissions

Background : The willingness of healthcare workers to risk their lives for a patient with a potentially fatal, communicable disease is a major concern, especially during a pandemic where the need for adequate staffing is crucial and where the public atmosphere might enhance anxiety and fear of exposure. Objective : To examine the relationships between the willingness of healthcare workers to risk their lives for a patient with a potentially fatal A/H1N1 flu, and knowledge of personal protection against infection, and trust in colleagues, workplace preparedness and the effectiveness of safety measures, during the winter A/H1N1 pandemic in Israel. Materials and Methods : A questionnaire was distributed to healthcare workers in 21 hospitals in Israel between 26 November 2009 and 10 December 2009 (the peak of the winter A/H1N1 flu outbreak). The questionnaire was completed by 1147 healthcare workers. Results : Willingness to risk one's life for a patient was significantly lower in females, respondents of younger age (18-24 years), administrative staff, and those with a non-academic education, as well as among those with a less knowledge about safety measures and among those with less trust in colleagues, in work place preparedness, and in the effectiveness of safety measures. Conclusions : Willingness to risk one's life for a patient is related to knowledge of safety measures, and trust in colleagues and work place preparedness. Education programs to enhance trust in colleagues, improve work place preparedness, and safety measures are recommended, especially for healthcare workers who are young, inexperienced, female, or administrative staff.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1957    
    Printed162    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded17    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal