Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 29-36

Isolated traumatic head injury in children: Analysis of 276 observations


1 Medical Intensive Care Unit, CHU H Bourguiba, Sfax, Tunisia
2 Department of Radiology, CHU H Bourguiba, Sfax, Tunisia
3 Department of Pediatrics, CHU H Chaker, Sfax, Tunisia

Correspondence Address:
Mabrouk Bahloul
Medical Intensive Care Unit, CHU H Bourguiba, Sfax
Tunisia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.76831

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Background : To determine predictive factors of mortality among children after isolated traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods : In this retrospective study, we included all consecutive children with isolated traumatic brain injury admitted to the 22-bed intensive care unit (ICU) of Habib Bourguiba University Hospital (Sfax, Tunisia). Basic demographic, clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were recorded on admission and during ICU stay. Results : There were 276 patients with 196 boys (71%) and 80 girls, with a mean age of 6.7 ± 3.8 years. The main cause of trauma was road traffic accident (58.3%). Mean Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 ± 2, Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 23.3 ± 5.9, Mean Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) was 4.8 ± 2.3, and Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) was 10.8 ± 8. A total of 259 children required mechanical ventilation. Forty-eight children (17.4%) died. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with a poor prognosis were PRISM > 24 (OR: 10.98), neurovegetative disorder (OR: 7.1), meningeal hemorrhage (OR: 2.74), and lesion type VI according to Marshall tomographic grading (OR: 13.26). Conclusion : In Tunisia, head injury is a frequent cause of hospital admission and is most often due to road traffic injuries. Short-term prognosis is influenced by demographic, clinical, radiological, and biochemical factors. The need to put preventive measures in place is underscored.


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