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INTERDISCIPLINARY FOCUS
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 106-113

Mucormycosis in immunochallenged patients


1 University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, Florida 33612, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, Florida 33612-4742, USA
2 University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, Florida 33612, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Tropical Diseases, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute; Associate Professor of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Oncology, University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612-9497, USA

Correspondence Address:
John N Greene
University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, Florida 33612, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Tropical Diseases, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute; Associate Professor of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Oncology, University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612-9497
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.42203

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Mucorales species are deadly opportunistic fungi with a rapidly invasive nature. A rare disease, mucormycosis is most commonly reported in patients with diabetes mellitus, because the favorable carbohydrate-rich environment allows the Mucorales fungi to flourish, especially in the setting of ketoacidosis. However, case reports over the past 20 years show that a growing number of cases of mucormycosis are occurring during treatment following bone marrow transplants (BMT) and hematological malignancies (HM) such as leukemia and lymphoma. This is due to the prolonged treatment of these patients with steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Liposomal amphotericin B treatment and posaconazole are two pharmacologic agents that seem to be effective against mucormycosis, but the inherently rapid onset and course of the disease, in conjunction with the difficulty in correctly identifying it, hinder prompt institution of appropriate antifungal therapy. This review of the literature discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of mucormycosis among the BMT and HM populations.


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